edens-blog:

beben-eleben:

Jim Dingilian proves that a creative and skillful artist can create works of art with just about anything. By coating the interior of empty glass bottles with black smoke and then carefully brushing it away with tools mounted on dowels, he creates detailed and beautiful but dark works of smoke art that are dripping with a sense of suburban decay (via Bored Panda).

are you shitting me

They’ll talk about diversity and anti-racism, but will interpret people pointing out whiteness and straightness as an insult rather than a fact. They’ll see it as an attack, because they’re used to comfy invisibility-as-default. They’ll praise “colorblindness” as though it’s something to aspire to. “Colorblindness” as an ideal has been criticized at length by many, many smart people—let’s listen. Don’t strive to make the marginalized invisible; strive to make the privileged visible.

It’ll make people uncomfortable. Trust me. They’ll live. The least the privileged can do is be aware of it.

Notice. Again and again and again, until it drives you to frustration because it’s everywhere. Until it drives others to frustration because they’re starting to notice, too, and now they can’t stop either.

Do not allow the barrage of majority narratives to pass unremarked upon.

Do not let the privileged be the default.

Notice.

jbatesart:

It’s been a great week in PR, and now I’m at the San Juan international airport, waiting to board my flight back to California. 

I will post photos and highlights from the trip in the coming weeks, but for now, here is a shot of a Coquí frog we found in Bosque Estatal de Toro Negro (state forest of the black bull). These little guys are the charismatic animal “mascots” of Puerto Rico. Males have a distinctive courtship call that consists of a low chirp followed by a high, shrill chirp. The lower the first chirp, the more aggressive the male appears to competitors that can hear him. The higher the second chirp, the more attractive the male appears to nearby females. They’re pretty neat little critters. I’m sure the locals have a cool origins story or something about them. They aren’t the easiest to find, but their calls are rather ubiquitous.

jbatesart:

It’s been a great week in PR, and now I’m at the San Juan international airport, waiting to board my flight back to California.

I will post photos and highlights from the trip in the coming weeks, but for now, here is a shot of a Coquí frog we found in Bosque Estatal de Toro Negro (state forest of the black bull). These little guys are the charismatic animal “mascots” of Puerto Rico. Males have a distinctive courtship call that consists of a low chirp followed by a high, shrill chirp. The lower the first chirp, the more aggressive the male appears to competitors that can hear him. The higher the second chirp, the more attractive the male appears to nearby females. They’re pretty neat little critters. I’m sure the locals have a cool origins story or something about them. They aren’t the easiest to find, but their calls are rather ubiquitous.

Hola from Puerto Rico! Today is the first day of my field studies program, and this morning we did some quick watercolors of insects that we light trapped the night before.

Everything is getting off to a great start! We spent the later morning snorkeling in a small bay near our apartments. Later today we’ll be collecting specimens to set in resin!

Hola from Puerto Rico! Today is the first day of my field studies program, and this morning we did some quick watercolors of insects that we light trapped the night before.

Everything is getting off to a great start! We spent the later morning snorkeling in a small bay near our apartments. Later today we’ll be collecting specimens to set in resin!

scumbugg:

unexplained-events:

The President

The 3200 year old tree so massive that it had never been captured in a single image until recently.

This giant sequoia stands 247 feet tall and measures 45,000 cubic feet in volume. The trunk alone measures 27 feet and the branches hold 2 billion needles (more than any tree on the planet).

This picture took a team of photographers from Nat Geo, 32 days and stitching together 126 different photos to make.

SOURCE

THIS IS SO COOL

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.